sailorscoutsays:

There’s always someone who is glad you’re alive.

sailorscoutsays:

There’s always someone who is glad you’re alive.

blessthebutt:

my favorite flavor of cake is more

omniastudios:

"Arianna" art deco inspired mermaid ring.

Available in brass and sterling silver. Arianna holds an 8mm black or white pearl.

Now available for purchase.

www.omniaoddities.com

help


Dianne Brill, Thierry Mugler Spring 1992

Dianne Brill, Thierry Mugler Spring 1992

chibi-momoko:

sweetie violet

chibi-momoko:

sweetie violet

get to know me meme1/5 favorite female characters: ELLE WOODS 
"If I’m going to be a partner in a law firm, I’m going to need a boyfriend who’s not such a bonehead."

christiancgtomas:

Favorite depictions of STORM/ORORO MUNROE

Salvador Larroca “Uncanny X-Men” 487-491
"You are brave woman, Storm. Very brave woman."

christiancgtomas:

Favorite depictions of STORM/ORORO MUNROE

Salvador Larroca “Uncanny X-Men” 487-491

"You are brave woman, Storm. Very brave woman."

fashionsfromhistory:

Costume for “Bugaku”
Barbara Karinska
1966

With its tight fitting, low-cut, sleeveless bodice and horizontal skirt sticking out from the hips, the ballet tutu is the iconic costume for the ballerina. Designers, however, have often conjured up costumes which stretch the boundaries of the conventions. This costume for George Balanchine’s ballet Bugaku, designed and made by Barbara Karinska, retains the overall traditions while adding enough reference, especially in the lacquered wig and kimono sleeves, to link it to the overall Japanese theme.
Most tutu skirts are composed of layers of net, but for Bugaku, Karinska devised a skirt of linked ‘petals’, each the depth of the skirt and highlighted by a rhinestone. The overall effect is much harder than the traditional tutu but is in keeping with the intellectually rigorous Balanchine choreography. The costume was worn in the wedding scene of the ballet with a long, diaphanous cloak; for the second scene, the tutu was removed to reveal the briefest of bikinis.

V&A

fashionsfromhistory:

Costume for “Bugaku”

Barbara Karinska

1966

With its tight fitting, low-cut, sleeveless bodice and horizontal skirt sticking out from the hips, the ballet tutu is the iconic costume for the ballerina. Designers, however, have often conjured up costumes which stretch the boundaries of the conventions. This costume for George Balanchine’s ballet Bugaku, designed and made by Barbara Karinska, retains the overall traditions while adding enough reference, especially in the lacquered wig and kimono sleeves, to link it to the overall Japanese theme.

Most tutu skirts are composed of layers of net, but for Bugaku, Karinska devised a skirt of linked ‘petals’, each the depth of the skirt and highlighted by a rhinestone. The overall effect is much harder than the traditional tutu but is in keeping with the intellectually rigorous Balanchine choreography. The costume was worn in the wedding scene of the ballet with a long, diaphanous cloak; for the second scene, the tutu was removed to reveal the briefest of bikinis.

V&A

jthenr-comics-vault:

COMIC BOOK CLOSE UP
S T O R MUncanny X-Men #145 (May 1981)Dave Cockrum (pencils), Josef Rubinstein (inks) & Glynis Wein (colors)

jthenr-comics-vault:

COMIC BOOK CLOSE UP

S T O R M
Uncanny X-Men #145 (May 1981)
Dave Cockrum (pencils), Josef Rubinstein (inks) & Glynis Wein (colors)

rosefaeries:

Christian Dior Haute Couture Spring 2010 Details

rosefaeries:

Christian Dior Haute Couture Spring 2010 Details